Motorola after Lenovo: Motorola’s flagship phones are vulnerable, and it won’t do anything about it

Google has always been a software company that occasionally ventures into hardware. Its Chromecast, for instance proved to be an instant success and its Nexus line of devices have proven to be excellent, and in case of the latest generation of Nexus devices, even successful.

But when it comes to the smartphone market, Google never directly creates smartphones, so as to not alienate its partners, and instead makes a phone with a different hardware partner each year to level the playing field.

But when Google bought Motorola, eyes lit up and everyone took notice, as it could mean Google’s entrance into the smartphone market. Other companies were obviously concerned, as Google could now both make the hardware and the software and didn’t need these hardware partners.

But companies like Samsung pressured Google into selling of Motorola, and whilst for the first few years, Motorola under Lenovo wasn’t any different from Motorola under Google (Other than stagnating innovation).

But now, two years after the deal, the ramifications of the Lenovo sale are finally showing.

Motorola has revealed that its latest Moto Z smartphone won’t be receiving monthly security updates that are slowly becoming a norm given the increasing number of vulnerabilities found in Android over the past year.

Motorola apparently believes in bundling together a bunch of security updates in one update, rather than having monthly updates. In fact, the Moto Z actually hasn’t receive security updates of the past two months, so it is technically vulnerable.  It is willing to risk its devices’ security for longer update cycles.

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